Finding the perfect Wedding Dj

Kings College Cambridge

1) Establish up front that you are the CLIENT and you are in charge. Let him know if you don’t like a talker. Tell him if he has absolutely no room for independent judgment. If you don’t want to hear a single song that isn’t on your personal playlist, let him know. Lay out the ground rules and don’t be afraid to be a little bit aggressive and put it writing, asking him to acknowledge your requests. Many wedding dj’s prefer you be upfront and direct. Just don’t be rude about it. There’s a way to be demanding without being Bridezilla. Be a little nicer if he’s your only option at the venue.

2) Be very specific about your playlist and, if he doesn’t give you a good form to work with, create your own and include the following categories:

Reception
– Cocktail music pre-entrance
– Entrance song
– First dance song
– Daddy/daughter dance song
– Mother/son dance song
– Cocktail music post-entrance
– Dinner music
– Cake cutting song
– Bouquet/garter toss songs
– Last dance

3) Decide whether you’re going to let the wedding dj take requests or not, and make sure you’re clear on the system with the wedding dj. If you’d prefer he not take requests, you can ask him to tell people that he doesn’t have the music being requested up to a certain point. If somebody gets aggressive, he might have to explain that the bride and groom have requested no spontaneous requests.

4) Be VERY SPECIFIC about your “Do Not Play” list. Those are the songs you really, really don’t want to hear at your wedding. You never know what your friends may request, and you’re better off making sure the wedding dj knows at the outset exactly how you feel about that. Trust me, “We are Family” can be a very awkward music selection in many groups.

5) Get your playlist to your wedding dj as early as possible. Every wedding dj has a different system, and many of them have to pull your playlist from their master systems, especially if you’re getting married somewhere like the tropics where the wedding dj’s might not have the most current systems. Some of them need time to make sure they have all your music ready in time for your wedding. At the very latest, have all song selections to your music master no less than 30 days prior to your wedding date. A full 90 days is even better.

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Choosing wedding entertainment

Milling Barn

When it comes to deciding on your wedding entertainment, booking the right type for your chosen venue is really important – you don’t want to be squeezing a 10-piece band onto a tiny stage, or putting an acoustic duo in the middle of a field. Read on to find out how to get it right…

What sort of wedding venue have you decided on? Are you having a country-style wedding in the summer with your reception in a marquee or barn? Have you decided to do the whole thing in a hotel? Maybe you’re having a city wedding with a small and intimate lunch or dinner in a chic restaurant?

There are a huge variety of places to tie the knot and celebrate your big day, and couples choose different venues for a variety of reasons – budget, location, time of year, the setting, the atmosphere and more. However, if you’ve decided to provide amusement for your guests at your wedding, you need to make sure that your entertainment is going to fit the venue you’ve chosen.

WHEN YOU’VE ROOM TO PARTY

If you’ve got a large space to fill, then your entertainment choices are only really limited by your budget.

Are you holding your reception in a barn? A castle? One idea we love is holding a ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee) for your guests. A ceilidh is a traditional Gaelic gathering with dancing to a live band, and this style of dancing has a number of advantages. Firstly, it appeals to all ages, from the young to the old – and it’s virtually guaranteed that everybody will have a good time. Secondly, everybody dances with everybody else, so you don’t need to have a fixed partner. Thirdly, it’s a great icebreaker and creates a wonderful atmosphere. Unlike a disco where not everybody wants to dance and enjoy the music, people find it hard to resist getting up to the foot-tapping rhythms of a ceilidh band.

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